New Plastic Five Pound Notes Celebrate London’s Iconic Skyline

The new ‘indestructible’ five-pound note was unveiled today in the Suffolk town of Bury. Made from tough polymer plastic and featuring some of London’s most iconic buildings, the new note is a celebration of our capital city’s skyline.

Today the first lot of a batch of 44 million £5 notes were released to the public, and they’re not quite the same as the previous ones.

The new note is made from polymer plastic which the Bank of England has said will keep them from getting dirty and ripped, and have extra anti-fraud features to prevent counterfeiters from easily copying the note. They are also said to be more environmentally friendly as they have been estimated to last 2.5 times as long as the previous batch.

As well as being made from ‘indestructible’ plastic, the notes have a whole new design. For starters, the new £5 notes are 15% smaller than the old ones, and have new famous faces on.

On the back of the new notes is former British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, sat above one of his famous quotes: “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat”.

Alongside Churchill, the new note shows prison reformer, Elizabeth Fry. But the part we like best is the addition of iconic London buildings including the Tower of London, Houses of Parliament and everyone’s favourite clock, Big Ben, whose hands point to 3 o’clock – the time Churchill made his famous speech on 13th May 1940.

London’s iconic buildings have been embellished in gold foil, holograms, raised ink and transparent windows to prevent fraud, but we think they’ve also added a certain extravagance to the capital city’s skyline.

You can still spend your old five pound notes until May 2017 and in the meantime the old ones will be collected by banks and shops.

To find out more, see the original article at The Mirror, or to discuss any aspect of the London property market, call us on 0207 4065 880.

About the Author Ellie Pierpoint

Ellie manages the content for the Capital Conveyancing site, finding ways to help Londoners looking for information and guidance around the conveyancing process, and presenting it in a clear way. Ellie loves writing about all things London, as her research leads her to discover new areas and history.

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